A Sentence Begins With A Capital Letter

Welcome back to school! I hope you enjoyed your fall break. Today we had some time to review sentence editing during our ELA block. Deciding where to add punctuation and capital letters when given two or three run-on sentences proved to be difficult for many scholars in our class. Below is a fun, short video I found to remind us what a complete sentence needs!

Time to Start Curriculum!

This week, our second grade team will be beginning to introduce our scholars to curriculum, while continuing to teach culture and routines for the remaining 10 Days of Culture. Reminder: We have our first English Language Arts test and our first Spelling test of the year this Friday, September 2nd! Below are some resources for what our scholars will be learning this week.

 

Phonics/Grammar Focus

  1. Phonics: short vowel sounds “a” and “i”
  2. Grammar: subjects and predicates
Spelling Words

  1. sad
  2. dig
  3. jam
  4. glad
  5. list
  6. win
  7. flat
  8. if
  9. fix
  10. rip
  11. kit
  12. mask
  13. as
  14. his
  15. sandwich
  16. picnic
Target Vocabulary Words

straight: not curling, curving, or bending

collars: bands that animals wear around their necks

row: a number of things arranged in a line

floppy: hanging or moving in a loose, droopy way

stood: was in an upright position on one’s feet

drooled: let saliva drip from the mouth

curly: having a twisted, ring, or spiral shape

weighed: had a certain heaviness

Your scholar may complete activities to help them practice this week’s spelling words here: www.spellingcity.com/missmcwoodson/

The Signmaker’s Assistant

When we get return from Spring Break, we will our next weekly ELA test will be on Friday, March 25th, and the comprehension section of the test will ask questions about “The Signmaker’s Assistant” by Tedd Arnold. Find the story on YouTube here:

Have a wonderful Spring Break! See you bright and early on Monday, March 21st!

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The Basics of Step Up to Writing

In the year of my teaching residency, I co-taught in a first grade classroom, where I became familiar with teaching writing to young students using a program called “Step Up to Writing”, from where the “Stoplight Paragraph” method originates. With this method, students use colors as visual clues to help them construct a clear, well-written paragraph, with a topic and closing sentence, at least two “big ideas”, and supporting details. I have learned this this fun, colorful method can be used with all types of writing we learn in second grade: narrative (stories), expository (information), and persuasive (opinion).

  • GREEN: Go! Topic Sentence.
    • YELLOW: Slow down! Big idea.
      • RED: Stop! Give a supporting detail.
    • YELLOW: Slow down! Big idea.
      • RED: Stop! Give a supporting detail.
  • GREEN: Go back! Remind the reader of your main idea.

The video below may help parents to gain a better idea of what all of these words and colors mean!

Fact or Opinion

This week in English Language Arts, my class is learning about facts vs. opinions. I found some fun online resources that allows students to participate in an activity while learning what facts and opinions are. The students really got a kick out of some of the opinion statements in the second video.

Contractions

contractionsThis week in second grade, we will be practicing with contractions. Below are some videos that might help your child become more familiar with contractions. The first video features a first grade class performing a rap about contractions and the second video gives a lesson then provides the typed lyrics to the Kidz Bop version of the Bruno Mars song “Just the Way You Are” so that the number of contractions used can be counted by students.

See you tomorrow bright and early!

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